Deux Chevaux Nieuws 2020 nummer 41/6

Deux Chevaux Nieuws 2020 nummer 41/6

Bekijk Deux Chevaux Nieuws 2020 nummer 41/6 als PDF (opent in nieuw venster).

In dit nummer:

Agenda 3
Openingstijden magazijn 3
Vandevoorzitter 4
Redactioneel 5
Vandesecretaris 5
Financiële admiistratie 7
Faits divers 7
Foto uit het verleden 9
Goed gesprek 10
Interview EiltJan Stuit 12
Sahara 1965 15
Limburgrit 17
Uitdeukmoment 20
Concours d’élegance 20
Met 12 pk door de Alpen 22
Fehactiviteiten 26
Waarde 27
Achterklep 28

English Summaries Deux Chevaux Nieuws 41/6 November 2019

From our Chairman

This is my last “From our Chairman” number 90 to be exact. I have always enjoyed writing these pieces, although it was sometimes difficult to find suitable topics. But luckily, I always had Irene who gave me ideas and got inspiration in France, where I stayed many times in recent years, there was always something that was worthwhile to be mentioned in our club magazine.
After more than 15 years of presidency, I thought it was time for others to take over. There will undoubtedly be members who find 15 years too long, but it was very difficult to find people who want to take on the administrative responsibility. I will look back a little.

Getting started

The start was at an unfortunate time. The previous board had resigned and the club was without a board. Due to the constant insistence of Cees Jansen telling me I should become the new chairman, I finally said yes under the explicit condition that Meine would become treasurer, Willem secretary and Ad warehouse representative on the board. Fortunately, all three said yes and so we started working with Tijs as event manager and Irene as editor of this beautiful magazine.

Warehouse

One of the first activities was to conduct a member survey to hear what is important among the members and what we as new board members could focus our policy on. Nobody was surprised that the warehouse was seen as the connecting factor within our club. Here, after some noses had to be turned in the right direction, the renovation and refurbishment plan emerged. We are not yet completely finished with the implementation, but the end is in sight.

Collaboration

A second is the collaboration with the other national 2CV clubs. We have put a lot of time into it and with trial and error we have now developed a form to work with. See, among other things, the beautiful Glossy of 2 years ago and the coordination we have with regard to the events, copying editorial articles. Before we started talking about cooperation with the other boards, we first convened a working group to gauge how far cooperation should go and, in particular, in which areas. The outcome of this conversation has become the guideline for all clubs to give substance to the collaboration.

Statutes

A third is the revision of the Statutes and the Rules of Procedure. Our old Statutes were no longer in line with the Civil Code. The realization of new statues went not always smoothly and many intense discussions within the board but also within the advisory group. I am proud that we have come out of it and that we can at least 10 years ahead if the legislator does not change the Civil Code.

When we started 15 years ago, one of the remarkable things was that we didn’t have our own clubhouse like so many clubs. Of course, we had and have the warehouse, but that does not have the appearance of a clubhouse. Sitting comfortably while drinking a cup of coffee and talking to other members about your hobby is simply more fun in a clubhouse than standing between parts. For me, our new clubhouse is the icing on the cake of my board membership period.

What we have not succeeded in is the rejuvenation of the membership and that is unfortunate because that depends on our future. Now I comfort myself with the thought that this applies to all historical automobile clubs. Nevertheless, it remains a major concern and I sincerely hope that we will be able to find a solution for this under the inspiring leadership of the intended new chairman Marc Beek. I hereby thank all members for the confidence and in particular the board members that they have had in me. I did it with pleasure and wish us all a good future.

Daan Vreeken
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05 Editorial

It’s here already, that last edition of the year! Do I have all the information about mext year’s club events, warehouse opening dates and, is there room for a X-mas card?

That all and the fact that we have to say goodbye to Daan as chairman. But there’s Marc Beek, his successor. Then again, a new treasurer, though he’s out again already, the webmaster who realizes that her job is more time consuming than expected, plus a new acquisition manager, Wouter.

Open positions

So we’re looking for a new webmaster, and also we’re in need of an extra pair of hands at the editor’s department.

Irene Doorenbos


05 Word from the secretary

Membership fees

At the last assembly it has been decided to raise the discount of € 1,50 on the membership fee to € 5,00 for members who have agreed on automatic membership fee payments.

The above results in the following: membership fees will be raised to € 43,50, for those allowing for automatic bank transfer nothing changes. The same fee counts for members living abroad. Unless any of the two allowing for automatic bank transfer, then the fee will be € 38,50. For donating members the fee is € 33,50, an automatic bank transfer agreement will give them the € 5,00 discount as well. Members and donating members not living in The Netherlands who’s desire it is to receive the DCN by mail are required to pay an extra € 20,- for postage.

The automatic bank transfer of the member fees for 2020 will be done at the end of December 2019. Please, if you still haven’t already allowed for the annual automatic bank transfer for the membership fees, we’d like to ask you to download the form on our web site, www.eeec.nl, fill it in and send it in before the 31st of Decmber, to secretaris@eeec.nl. Other payment is to be done before December 31st, please mention your membership number on the transfer. Leaving our club? please let us know before December 1st.

Warehouse voucher

If you have a warehouse voucher which is valid until the end of 2019, you can extend the validity by sending it to the secretary for e three year extention.

Members’ list

A new list has been put together, members living abroad have not received it, we haven’t sent it. We are not allowed by law to publish the list on the internet, but if you are interested in having a paper version of the list, please contact secretaris@eeec.nl.
Merry X-mas and a happy 2020!

Willem Klein Lankhorst


07 Financial administration

EEEC membership administration, warehouse administration and financial administration.

When treasurer Bernard Jonkhoff started his new function within the club he proposed to run the club’s financial administration digitally through a bookkeping program. The board members agreed, but the to be used program should be competitive with the procedures concerning membership and warehouse administrations.

Relezee

Bernard choice of program was called Relezee (pronounced: real easy) but the board told hm that this program was too large and too heavy for our relatively simple administrative set up. Still, Bernard proceeded to implement Relezee and soon it became clear that data from our membership administration was impossible to import into the Relezee program (this was a prerequisit made by the board). Bernard put in a lot of effort and time in the manual input of the membership data into Relezee.

Warehouse

Together with Jaap Heeringa the warheouse procedures were imported into Relezee and it worked well. But not any better than our original and club owned software that we are already using.

More expensive

It turned out that Relezee pulled the alarm after a few transactions telling us that the maximum number of transactions have been reached, and that, in order to continue, an extended contract, and an expensive one, needs to be bought. We are talking about € 50 to € 60 a month extra. There was no connection possible between the membership administration, so any change would need to be made in both systems.

The board concluded that this was not the right way for us to continue, so the request was made to Bernard not to continue working with Relezee. Bernard was very disappointed while he had been putting in a lot of effort and time and he announced to step down from his position a treasurer as of August the 1st 2019.

At the following board meeting it was agreed to accept Bernard’s decision to step down. For the moment the secretary will combine, as happens so often in other associations, the position of secretary and treasurer. After a year the board will evaluate the situation and decide to continue as is or to try and find a new treasurer

The EEEC board


07 Faits Divers

2CV photo album ‘made in Switzerland’

Mr Arie Wubben from Oberrieden / Zürich in Switzerland sent us a collection of 112 photos, taken by himself. They all show beautiful Citroëns. I suspect it’s Anneke Keizer, one of our translators, who pushed Mr Wubben to send us these photos, it’s her own 2CV that has been photographed by Mr Wubben.
Irene

2CV van weekend

It was a full house at Camping de Boterbloem in Leersum, full of 2CV vans. Member Mr M.A. Zwanenburg sent us an impressive impression of this event.


EEEC membership administration, warehouse administration and financial administration.

When treasurer Bernard Jonkhoff started his new function within the club he proposed to run the club’s financial administration digitally through a bookkeping program. The board members agreed, but the to be used program should be competitive with the procedures concerning membership and warehouse administrations.

Relezee

Bernard choice of program was called Relezee (pronounced: real easy) but the board told hm that this program was too large and too heavy for our relatively simple administrative set up. Still, Bernard proceeded to implement Relezee and soon it became clear that data from our membership administration was impossible to import into the Relezee program (this was a prerequisit made by the board). Bernard put in a lot of effort and time in the manual input of the membership data into Relezee.

Warehouse

Together with Jaap Heeringa the warheouse procedures were imported into Relezee and it worked well. But not any better than our original and club owned software that we are already using.

More expensive

It turned out that Relezee pulled the alarm after a few transactions telling us that the maximum number of transactions have been reached, and that, in order to continue, an extended contract, and an expensive one, needs to be bought. We are talking about € 50 to € 60 a month extra. There was no connection possible between the membership administration, so any change would need to be made in both systems.

The board concluded that this was not the right way for us to continue, so the request was made to Bernard not to continue working with Relezee. Bernard was very disappointed while he had been putting in a lot of effort and time and he announced to step down from his position a treasurer as of August the 1st 2019.

At the following board meeting it was agreed to accept Bernard’s decision to step down. For the moment the secretary will combine, as happens so often in other associations, the position of secretary and treasurer. After a year the board will evaluate the situation and decide to continue as is or to try and find a new treasurer

The EEEC board


09 photo from the past

We received this photo from C.E. van Sluijs, it shows a 2CV van, in use as an ice-cream van. It’s is most likely a home made adaption. It’s a 1986 van, the pic was taken in Nice in the south of France.

We are always interested in 2Cv pics, so don’t hesitate to send them to us. Preferably in large format, sent through WeTransfer if possible, to: redactie@eeec.nl.


10 How a jigsaw puzzle can lead to a good conversation

Via email I received a photo of the famous 2CV jigsaw puzzle produced as advertisement for Nevada wool. Nice that someone is thinking of sending it to me. So, I thanked and looked at who the puzzle actually came from. That turned out to be a nice surprise, because Ronald Wagenaar and Harrie IJlst proved to be the driving forces behind the company Ranonkel Arrangers in Beemster. “Flowers Plants visible differently” and walking through their website indeed shows this in abundance. Flowers, plants, fantastic arrangements and, most notably, a very beautiful Best Duck. All this was reason enough to visit the Beemster once. We are received very warm welcome in a very beautiful old building. Just as beautiful as their store in Midden Beemster, just as full of all kinds of “Old stuff” as Harrie calls it rude. Maybe old stuff, but very artistically hung up and displayed.

Borrowed

We start with the best 2CV. It is in what used to be the garage of the local fire truck. Until the fire brigade bought a new garage, a much larger one. The choice was “raise the roof” or “sell.” The latter has happened and Ronald and Harrie, who lived next door, have bought a perfect home for their 2CV, and for a lot of their stuff. The 2CV is from 1962, it looks like an 18 hp, with suicide doors and the odometer still as a clock on the left of the dashboard. Research by Hans reveals that there is no Choke button on it. The 2CV looks very nice in any case, sleek in the paint, with a billboard on the side and back. Exactly as large as the plates on it with snaps, so that the snaps are reused.

Help to push

To the question how it came about, Harrie first answers. His first memories of a 2CV go back when he was around eight to nine years old. He stayed with an uncle and aunt in Alphen aan de Rijn. They would make a trip “by car”. All the children stayed outside the car waiting. “Why don’t we get in the car too?” Harrie asked? “We first want to see if she wants to start, otherwise we have to push.” They were so used to it that they thought his question was strange. But what an experience, such a ride in a 2CV! The wonderful smell, the ease with which roundabouts could be “taken”. He was completely sold. Just pushing was not bad at all. You could easily sit in the back with five children. The 2CVV of his uncle had a Palmabak (extension on the 2CV trunk) for when more things had to be taken. The 2CV was burgundy red, not unimportant.

Nostalgia

Harrie use to work for a boss who had a blue 2CV truckette, in which he regularly drove. About thirteen years ago, they were looking and they came across this truckette in the east of the country. They actually bought the car for nostalgic reasons. Then for the advertising of their company. On Mother’s Day, for example, the car is standing in front of their store, with a very big bow around it “for mother.” If you sell flowers and plants, you actually sell emotion and the 2CV helps translating these emotions. If you have never been in a 2CV in your youth, a car like that doesn’t mean much to you either. You must have driven one before you understand the 2CV. The store is located in the middle of the Beemster and is an old forge. There is also an installation in front of the store, in which horses can be fitted with horseshoes. This also happens on special occasions. In addition, there is an artist who regularly uses the forge and makes the most beautiful things. They have completely restored the store.

Their 2CV is under maintenance at Sander Aalderink. When they just owned the car, they did a “a tour around the Ijsselmeer” actually on one cylinder, because the other was stuck. The disadvantage of that is, when you first drive a car, you do not know how fast it should normally go. After Sander has repaired the problem, the car drives much faster.

Anecdote

When asked about a special anecdote, both men independently come to the same story. They once stood on the Ijsselmeer dike near Hoorn once and then the 2CV did not want to start anymore. They did look at everything at the time, but could not find anything. Called the roadside assistance and it arrived fairly quickly. It turned out that the plugs of the ignition coil were not fully seated. So, it was fixed very quickly and the mechanic didn’t even make his hands dirty. But after that the man spent more than fifteen minutes talking and admiring the 2CV. Harrie also tells about an experience on the Afsluitdijk. They had stopped halfway at the monument and when they drove on, the lock had just opened at the start of the dike. So, they had the whole road to themselves, really the whole dike. That was a very special experience. Hans and I spent a pleasant morning with two special 2CV drivers.


12 Interview EiltJan Stuit

Communication, in this case between two 2CV’s on vacation abroad, was the subject of EiltJan Stuit and Daniël Lamsma during the “emergency repair game” on Saturday evening during the anniversary weekend in Bunnik. As simple as possible: two cups, connected with a string. Complete with explanation and demonstration.

Daniel

Asked Daniel what he knows about the 2CV, he is very modest: “Well, he has four wheels and a steering wheel.” But he did ride 2CV. When he was just married in ’74 and bought a house, he was able to buy a 2CV from the tax benefit. An orange 2CV4, license plate: 83-30-TK, less than a year old, with those round headlights. He then lived in Tietjerk, near Leeuwarden. He thought the 2CV was beautiful, he was economical and affordable (bought for NL Guilders 3500). He then worked in Leeuwarden. With good weather he went by bike and with bad weather with the 2CV. He had him for four years. Went with it to Spain, back seat out, tent in the car. The changed family composition and the increasing distances to be bridged were the reason for selling the 2CV. He then traded him in for a Renault 4. So much for Daniel’s adventures with the 2CV.

EiltJan

The experiences of EiltJan are a bit different. Every now and then a car was rented at home and that was a 2CV. His first car as a student was a 2CV4 Special from ’76, a yellow one. It had such a bad body that the B-pillar at the bottom was already rotated after two years. He entered military service in ’77 and they had a key club there. How a-technical he was at that time is apparent from the fact that when everyone on offer at the car hobby club bought coolant, he was persuaded to do the same for his 2CV. On the tailgate of his special adorned with large adhesive letters the text ‘your driver’s license is not yet a hunting license’. He intended to make the 2CV even more economical to drive and therefore to convert it to gas. He wanted to build that gas in himself, but it failed. Moreover, there was the wish that things could be a little faster. As a result, he switched to other types of cars. The 2CV was out of the picture for a long time.

Party

Years after that, he and his wife were together 100 years old and that was the reason for a big party. Always good to have an excuse for a party. Then they received a gift from Daniël for a weekend in a 2CV that he had borrowed for this occasion from a colleague. Including a large well-filled picnic basket. It was wonderful to ride in a 2CV again, pure nostalgia. Their second car was due for replacement and the choice was then made to buy another 2CV, and then a restoration project.

First a French dealer from ’64 bought a French Azam from ’64. Because the wish was for suicidal doors, EiltJan bought another one and a half 2CV in France. From this colorful collection of parts, one complete 2CV would be assembled. He has been working on it for five years. He has gradually learned how a 2CV works and has learned to weld, for example. When he finally came to the RDW, there was no chassis number. Because he did have all the papers, they gave him “the benefit of the doubt” and took the chassis number. However, a few hundred euros of research of four months was preceded by this, including contact with the Prefect in France. This is the 2CV with which EiltJan now comes to the meetings and drives the rides, an 18 hp AZAM from 1964, AR-76-03, color AC147 gris typhone.

Helping out

What was Daniel’s contribution to this entire process? As he says himself: “Well, help lift with bodywork and chassis”, and show interest. Daniël has been a colleague for years and then also became a neighbor. When EiltJan was tinkering, Daniël regularly came to visit. That is also easier than the communication over two cups and the string.

It is Daniel who, for EiltJan, answers the question of what was the biggest obstacle to restoration. “The dog, because it eats the workshop manuals and other literature”. And indeed, the beautiful photo album that EiltJan has kept of the entire restoration has already been eaten, all corners are finished. The logbook that he keeps is still intact. It contains columns with odometer readings, moments of refueling, how much, oil consumption, repairs, journeys, and what destination. “That’s nice for the kids later, if they take over the 2CV, they can see exactly all the facts.” It is the sport of EiltJan to drive as economically as possible and he can also read that from his logbook.

Holidays

The best thing about having a 2CV is tinkering. But also driving, because Anja is there too. Like we were on holiday in France in 2017 in the 2CV. Especially the reactions of the audience. Such as stories of “I’ve had one like that” and ask if they can sit in it and take a photo. The 2CV was taken to France on the trailer, because with an average of 50 km/hour the holidays are too short for such a long journey. Tinkering is also a kind of meditation for EiltJan, a “Zen moment”. He can clear his head nicely by tinkering. He is a technology teacher at a school for children with all kinds of psychiatric problems and behavioral problems that arise from it. In addition, such a “Zen moment” can be very useful. Both men have children and grandchildren. But the children are not allowed to ride in the 2CV because of the lack of seat belts and so that does not happen either. They may sit in it when it is stationary.

The club

EiltJan came to the club when he was almost finished with the restoration, so he only visited the warehouse twice. This is now the third camping weekend, with EiltJan and Daniël present. They really enjoy it. It used to be “we don’t know anyone there”, but you open your bonnet and you are entitled to it. It’s nice to see how everyone is “hugging” his 2CV. Striking is the willingness of the members to help each other and how they want the best for each other. When he is retired, about five years from now, he wants to become more active in the club. When asked about the future of the club, EiltJan thinks it is good to combine the useful (sharing knowledge and the warehouse) with the pleasant (weekends and rides) and that the club can continue this way for years to come. for him.

New 2CV

He recently bought another French 2CV in Wilnis, an 18 hp with a centrifugal clutch and homokinetic drive shafts. He will transfer that technique into his own 2CV. In addition, a year is smuggled with the age of the car. A question that currently concerns him is to what extent the combination of centrifugal clutch and homokinetic drive shafts is original on a French 2CV (AZAM?) With an 18-horsepower engine from 1965. If there are club members who can tell a bit more about this, he learns that please: ejstuit@ziggo.nl

Irene Doorenbos and Hans Westrik

Small addition to interview with Daniël and me. With the anniversary weekend, Daniel has become so enthusiastic for the 2CV event that he himself went looking for a beautiful 2CV again. He was fed up with the “whining” that if he goes with the EEEC weekend again he will have to come up with his own 2CV. Now then, it’s time. Daniël becomes a member of the club. He has bought a really beautiful rock-hard 2CV, entirely in line with his emphatic wish that nothing more should be done about it. Tour and enjoy!


14 Sahara 1965, 20495 km

It’s the 29th of June 1965 when Mr Lauterjung enters the Automobilhaus Ebbinghaus & Oberdiek in Solingen, it’s the local Citroën dealership. Sales person Mr Kehrer and Mr Ebbinghaus jr are receiving his order for a Citroën ‘Geländewagen’ (4WD) Typ ‘Sahara’. The Sahara will be a standard version, but painted in ‘militärgrün’ (military green). There’s a 5 week delivery period, the price is 10.150,- DM (Deutschmark) plus import and transport costs of total 150,- DM.
Mr Lauterjung will use the Sahara mainly for his hunting trips, hence the military green overspray.

Delivery

The importer in Cologne receives the car in August the 2nd and registers the car on the 11th. It is not clear if the car was already painted military green before arriving in Cologne, or that it was painted in Cologne

The oval reflectors on the rear panel indicate a specific Belgian origin, but German models were also seen with this 1960ies accesory. Hella indicator lights and numberplate lights are common on 2CVs sold to the German market. It is clearly one of the first more modern versions, with electric window wipers and safe doors, not the suicide doors.

The car files

The car came with a file containing all sorts, like insurance papers and other pieces of paper with information. One is about a Mr Müller who, in April ’67, ran his Opel into the right hand front panel. The 2x 16hp (24kW) Sahara is taken to a workshop to be repaired and is parked next to a 300hp (221kW)Porsche. Another piece of paper shows the MOT done in 1981 with 17.324 km mileage.

Coming to The Netherlands

The Sahara was sold to a local engineer in March ’83. He was maybe a friend of the first owner as it seems he was worjing in the same aluminium casting industry. This person ends up selling it to a Dutch enthousiast who sells his Traction Avant in order to be able to buy the Sahara. By this time the fromt panels are fitted with round indicator lamps and it’s been oversprayed with a lighter version of army green.

Two engines

While registering at the taxation office in the city of Leeuwarden, clerk Mr Van der Zee notices that ‘this car has been fitted with two engines’. It’s as early as May 1984 that the car finally get its Dutch registration. It is quite possible that the 20.000 km that is showing on the odometer is the actual mileage because the car has never been admitted to the 1985 MOT or afterwards. So there’s no visible proof of the car having done 120.000 instead of 20.000 kms.

Well preserved

The Sahara was stored in the owner’s (an EEEC member) farm for years, next to other classic Citroëns (een EEEC lid), with the intention to fully restore it. The pair of new old stock front panels will be used in that case, replacing one of the two other non original panels, the other one has disappeared.

The original engines, with subsequent serial numbers, are still together, and have been serviced and in running order.

This is what is written about this car, as published on the website of Sander Aalderink, the Dutch 2CV specialist. Edwin Groen, the owner of Holland’s best 2CV museum, we drive off to Sander in Wormer to see the Sahara and to buy it. The job to restore it is put in my care, it is my 4th Sahara restoration, a challenge. I like the fact that it is mostly in original condition, with all panels untouched and plenty of parts stamped with the AW parts number. I will head to The museum in the village of Andijk to deliver a restored Belgium Sahara and to take home the above described German one.

The car will be brought back to its original state and colour, ‘Armee Grün’, including the specifications as prescribed for the German market at that time.

Tijs Kolen


17 Limburg Tour

Limburg Tour region South report dated; 6 October, 2019, organized by Jan Gielen. “Who is showing us Limburg”, even when it rains.

Sunday October 6th was the day: the annual Limburg Tour, as always set out by Jan Gielen of Regio Zuid. From 11 am we were welcome at the Heioord trout fishing pond in Neeritter. Reception “comme l’habitude” with coffee or tea and of course Limburg pie.

Despite the rain there was a considerable turnout of no less than 16 2CV’s and 2 Dyanes. At 12 o’clock was the start of a very beautiful ride through Dutch and Belgian Limburg. The ride took us along beautiful roads through forest and farmland. Roads with Limburg names such as “Processieweg” and “Grensweg”, along Saint Ritha and Luysmolen.

Lunch

Lunch was at restaurant Nieuw Vosseven, a nice relaxation with a beautiful terrace. The terrace unfortunately remained unused that day due to bad weather. Whoever had to go to the toilet hopefully smiled just as much as I did about the (slightly women unfriendly) paintings on the toilet doors: Hopefully everyone has found the right door!

After lunch, unfortunately, a number of people had to go home, but in the end, we returned to the trout pond with 15 very dirty 2CV’s. We had a drink at a very large table and then everyone went on his way home.

Jan and Mien, thank you very much again for a wonderful and pleasant drive through Limburg. Chapeau!

Liesbeth Wagensveld


19 Panelbeating

On Sunday August the 25th Rien de Klerk and Hans van Gils went to The Soestdijk palace to visit the Concours d’Élegance.

Before driving off to see the Concours Hans and Rien had a panelbeating job to do. Hans had kissed Rien’s car while partaking a one of the tours as Rien’s engine suddenly stalled and Hans, not noticing in time, bumped into Rien’s car. Hans’ bonnet and left side fender got dented, Rien’s 2CV rear bumper only had a scratch.

The guys did their best to undo the damage, which is to be seem by the pictures.

The editor


20 Concourd d’Élegance

On a sunny Sunday the 25th of August Hans van Gils, Jan Blom and I went out to visit the Concours d’Elegance at the former royal Soestdijk Palace.

Hans had planned to come over a day early, travelling from Vlissingen in the southwest of The Netherlands, to my place in Breda. Together we had planned to tackle a small panelbeating job on my car on the Saturday, before attending to this ‘Classics at the Palace’ event. After this job we enjoyed a lovely meal and an ice cream. We got up early on, had breakfast and took off in our old 2CVs to join Jan Blom who was waiting for us in his 1961 ID at a petrol station

Early birds

As we started so early it gave us the opportunity to park our cars right up front on the Oldtimer Citroën section. Klaas Jonker, Teunis with his AZAM and Jeanette van den Hazel arrived at the same time.

Citroën 100 year

Citroën’s presence was well represented, not in te least due to the 100 Year Citroën presentation and the presented classic Citroëns’, like our club’s beige 2CV SK-13-10. We had a look at the latest Citroën concept, the 19_19, and compared it to the other cars like Rolls-Royce, Mercedes etc.. Still, I’d rather check out the old racing cars like the Singer and the Meteor fitted with bicycle headlights doing their job as rear view mirrors.
We ran into quite a few club members as we strolled through the royal gardens, Pieter Vogel and his son Yannick, Jan Nijboer. Citroën spoiled us handing out AutoWeek Classics magazines, stickers, IDEAT contemporary life (1919-2019 citroën A 100 ANS!) book.

A picknick

Our bellies rang the lunch bell around midday, so we enjoyed our lunch nearour cars, with seven buzzards circelling above our heads, like drones. Hans decided to leave us after lunch, with quite a distance to cover. Jan and I chatted with a few Willy’s Jeep owners who had parked their cars next tgo ours. We saw Frits Dunnewind leave in his 2CV-AZ with a Visa engine, the car he drove to visit the World Meeting in Croatia.

With temperatures rising that afternoon Jan and I decided to return home, We stuck together until we reached Breda, Jan continued to Baarle Nassau. All in all it was an impressive event, though we didn’t spot any member of the royal family

Rien de Klerk – Breda


26 Fehactivities

FEHAC Academy: RDW & inspections. RDW = Motor Vehicle Bureau in the Netherlands. This is an event that is regularly organized by the FEHAC. Only because the production of our club magazine takes quite some time, we are always a little behind with these kinds of announcements. Registration was until October 6 and this issue will come to your much later. Do you want to participate next time? Contact the FEHAC directly. Talk to the people of the RDW. Who doesn’t want that? RDW is an important organization for car and motorcycle enthusiasts.

That is why advocate FEHAC is in regular contact with RDW. On all kinds of topics such as suspensions or demolitions in-house.

In practice, the contacts between ‘customer’ and RDW sometimes raises questions. That is why FEHAC is organizing a theme evening together with RDW. There you will learn everything about how RDW works, and you can ask the people of the RDW questions.
During the program the RDW explains how the various inspections work and what points are considered.
• import car inspections
• activate sleeping license plates
• abrasive find
• compound vehicle

In the second part, RDW answers questions that will stay with you. That is: general questions. RDW cannot answer questions about individual cases or vehicles on a theme evening.
RDW has offered to go through the questions in advance and, where necessary, to sort things out in advance. Then you know for sure that you will receive an answer to the question that has been occupying you for so long.

If you have a question for RDW, mail it to: secretariaat@fehac.nl no later than 6 October
State the subject: ‘Ask RDW evening’.

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The ideal fuel for old-timers is not there yet
Most modern fuels are not suitable for refueling in vintage cars.
The modern fuels must however meet these requirements:
1. the fuel must be suitable for mobile heritage and must therefore not contain bioethanol
2. the fuel must produce as little emission as possible
3. the fuel must be as climate neutral as possible, therefore a reduction of CO2 emissions in the entire process from production to use in mobile heritage (‘from well to wheel’)
4. the fuel must be fossil-free and renewable and do not require scarce resources

The FEHAC is in talks with those who are concerned with the future of fuels and they too see opportunities for producing new fuels that meet these requirements. In addition, we notice that more and more policy makers also see these fuels as an interim solution until all newly sold road vehicles are emission-free. This makes the development of ‘innovative fuel’ important not only for the mobile heritage, but for all vehicles that will still run on fossil fuel now and in the near future.

More ethanol is not good for vintage cars
The major disadvantage is that it is not suitable for use in our historic vehicles.
From 5% to 10% ethanol
Up to now, a maximum of 5% bioethanol has been added to gasoline; this did not cause many problems because there were enough alternatives for vehicles for which gasoline with blended ethanol is unsuitable.

Bio ethanol

The arrival of E10 petrol is a good development for modern vehicles and makes the Dutch gasoline car less dependent on fossil fuels.

Ethanol free remains available

E10 is therefore unsuitable for historic vehicles, because the bio-ethanol in this petrol affects rubbers and gaskets and can also cause a higher engine temperature, causing cooling problems. It can also lead to rust problems in the tanks, because ethanol attracts water and then becomes so aggressive for metal that it can cause a leaking tank. The government knows that too, so ethanol-free petrol and E5 will continue to be sold. But E10 will certainly become the most sold gasoline.

Advice: always refill 98 premium gasoline

As FEHAC, we recommend that in vintage cars fueled only ethanol-free gasoline with 98 octane or more is refueled. These are now Shell V-Power, BP Ultimate or Competition 102 from Firezone. The FEHAC is now in talks with a producer who is going to look at a different bio-product than bio-ethanol, which can be used in our mobile heritage without the risk of engine damage.

FEHAC


27 Worthless or Use full

The more than 30 years that I have been driving in my ’58 AZ now I started to think about the environment. As a humanitarian participant in our society, I actually prefer not to put myself in a polluting vehicle, and realization that I already have been environmentally friendly as a child. As a child I was driving in a pedal car and later on a bicycle. But because of a hungry feeling about how technology works, I started on my 15th birthday working on mopeds. I thought such an internal combustion engine was so beautiful, I wanted to know everything about it: starting with a Solex and then on from there. Eventually it became a BMW R67/2, a motorcycle with a boxer engine that was linked to the 2CV engine, but then upside down (camshaft at the top at BMW and at the bottom at 2CV).

Motorcycle

Until the age of 22 I rode a motorcycle. When I left the house and it was more convenient to choose a car in connection with taking property and good. I sold the BMW and bought a ’69 18hp from a dealer in Amersfoort. Once I had bought an Olyslager booklet from the scrambled 2CV (ribbed cap), which I would have preferred, but then I did not have money enough so I bought a 18hp. Actually, as an avid motorcyclist, I had a small shame that I was driving a car now, so it had to be at least a car, that was a 2CV, there is nothing more to do than need to drive. In the meantime, I have driven that 2CV for about 8 years and “let it go through my hands,” to the bone. At that time, I lived/worked in Breda at a company for revision of electric motors, etc… I always worked outside working hours on motorcycles, customers’ cars, for acquaintance. After a year I moved to Amsterdam and started working for “de Handel”, for me a golden age and learned a lot.

Lelystad

Especially the DS and later the CX was a nice “earnings model”. Moved to Lelystad in 1980 and started my own garage with the main objective: repairing French cars. In the meantime, I was so fed up with 2CV, customers wanted a discount and a good purchase, well I didn’t get along with it. Right in front of my garage a young man had started a garage as a specialist in the 2CV’s: Garage Deusjevo, so that worked out well: my garage in the more luxurious segment and his garage in the 2CV.

However, some 30 years later I started to enjoy working on the 2CV again, I was allowed to deliver a good product, there was and still is money to make in the business. For example, last week I invited an appraiser to appraise a ‘dance son jus’ 2CV. I arrange to shoot a nice picture of the AZ (U). These cars have still the original paint on them. The appraiser was so impressed that from the half an hour what he had planned for this visit, turned in to out two hours for the 2CVs. The average value for the “rust” 2CV’s now varies between 10k-15k.

Whether that is nice and nice, I wonder, the Citroen DS is now worth so much that for me the fun has gone, in the sense that I then have to tinker with the material value instead of the use value. For me, that detracts from my profession.

Hans Jorissen